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Lack of information hampers vocational training push

MalayMail Online, Ipoh, 25 November 2017 - Lack of information and inadequate career guidance have contributed to the decline of non-academically inclined secondary students taking up vocational courses.

Most said they were unaware of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) after completing their Form Three. 

Kalaiarasan Pandian, 19, from Kampar, said he wasn’t aware of TVET programmes when he chose to stop schooling after Form Three. 

“I was not aware of TVET courses and even my teachers did not suggest I take up vocational training. 

“They only persuaded me to complete my studies until Form Five,” he told Malay Mail recently.

He also said he did not know where the TVET institutions were, and this hampered the process of applying for courses offered.

Kalaiarasan, now employed as a motorcycle mechanic, said he quit studying as his academic results were not up to mark and his parents could not provide financial support to further his studies.

On Monday, Deputy Education Minister Datuk P. Kamalanathan said only seven per cent of students across the country took up TVET after Form Three. 

He also said the ministry took various steps to increase rural students’ enrolment in vocational colleges. 

The measures were gaining popularity following broadcasts over radio channels, newspaper advertisements and collaboration with non-governmental organisations.

Teenager, Veenod Nathan,18, from Pusing, Perak, said he did not know about the TVET programme as there wasn’t much promotion on it. 

“I’m not aware of  TVET courses and the vocational schools that I know are from my home.  

“I quit school two years ago as I wasn’t performing well in studies and at the same time my father met with a bad accident. 

“He could not go to work and I have to support my family by working,” he said. 

Veenod who is working as a labourer in a warehouse said students who fared poorly in their studies might go for vocational courses if proper guidance were given to them. 

Khoo See Nee, 28, who is also a school drop-out, lamented that vocational training such as TVET was not available during her schooling days. 

“If I had this option back then, I would definitely have taken up vocational training,” she said. 

Khoo said she did not pursue any other vocational education after coming out of school as her guardians could not support her.

Another dropout, who wished to be only known as Derrick, said he felt he had no purpose in life after gaining his SPM last year.

“I did not know what to do and I ended doing various jobs merely to pass time,” the 19-year-old said.

A relative then introduced Derrick to vocational studies.

Currently undergoing training to repair air conditioners and refrigerators in Kuala Lumpur, Derrick took a loan from Kojadi to subsidise the RM20,000 needed for the course.

Meanwhile, MCA Youth vocational education bureau committee member Jimmy Loh blamed parents and students for the lack of interest in vocational training.

“Parents prefer their children to follow the traditional path which can land them a degree but they are not aware that you can also earn a degree from vocational courses,” he said.

Students, he said, were not bothered to seek out information about vocational courses.

Source: http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/lack-of-information-hampers-vocational-training-push#AcPJjOIRlu4HTLrO.97

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